Actinostrobus

Actinostrobus species

Family: Coniferales

Names:

Actinostrobus acuminatus, Actinostrobus arenarius, Actinostrobus pyramidalis

Summary:

A densely branched shrub with rows of small triangular leaves.

Description:

First leaves:

Leaves:

Small, in rings of 3. Sets at right angles to each other along the stem.
Stipules - none
Petiole - none
Blade - Triangular, keeled, tip pointed.

Stems:

Thick side branches carry female cones.

Flower head:

Male and female cones.

Flowers:

Male cones are egg shaped at he ends of branches or in axils. Scales in rings of 3 with 2-3 sporangia on the lower side.
Female cones have 6 fertile valves that are all the same size with closely pressed overlapping scales at the base.

Fruit:

Seeds:

1 in each valve with 2-3 wings.

Roots:

Key Characters:

Female cones have 6 fertile valves that are all the same size and have 6-12 scales at the base.

Biology:

Life cycle:

Perennial

Physiology:

Reproduction:

By seed.

Flowering times:

Female cones present all year. Male cones present in spring to summer.

Seed Biology and Germination:

Vegetative Propagules:

Hybrids:

None.

Allelopathy:

Population Dynamics and Dispersal:

Spread by wind borne seed.

Origin and History:

A West Australian native. There are only 3 species in this genus and they are all in the south west of Western Australia.

Distribution:

WA.

Actinostrobus acuminatus
Courtesy Australia's Virtual Herbarium.


Actinostrobus arenarius
Courtesy Australia's Virtual Herbarium.


Actinostrobus pyramidalis
Courtesy Australia's Virtual Herbarium.

Habitats:

Climate:

Temperate Mediterranean

Soil:

Swampy.

Plant Associations:

Significance:

Beneficial:

Grown as an ornamental plant.

Detrimental:

Toxicity:

Not recorded as toxic.

Legislation:

The Wildlife Conservation Act prohibits removal of native plants from the wild in their native range on government land.

Management and Control:

Not usually necessary.

Eradication strategies:

Clearing and grazing controls it.

Herbicide resistance:

None reported.

Biological Control:

None likely because it is an Australian Native species of little significance as a pest plant.

Related plants:

Actinostrobus acuminatus
Actinostrobus arenarius
Actinostrobus pyramidalis

Plants of similar appearance:

Coastal Pine (Callitris columellaris) and Cypress Pines (Callitris) can be distinguished because they have unequal sized cone valves whereas the cone valves in Actinostrobus are all the same size.

References:

Auld, B.A. and Medd R.W. (1992). Weeds. An illustrated botanical guide to the weeds of Australia. (Inkata Press, Melbourne).

Black, J.M. (1965). Flora of South Australia. (Government Printer, Adelaide, South Australia).

Bodkin, F. (1986). Encyclopaedia Botanica. (Angus and Robertson, Australia).

Everist, S.L. (1974). Poisonous Plants of Australia. (Angus and Robertson, Sydney).

Lamp, C. and Collet, F. (1990). A Field Guide to Weeds in Australia. (Inkata Press, Melbourne).

Marchant et al (1987). Flora of the Perth Region. (Western Australian Herbarium, Department of Agriculture, Western Australia). P59. Diagram.

McBarron, E.J. (1983). Poisonous plants. (Inkata Press, Melbourne).

Acknowledgments:

Collated by HerbiGuide. Phone 08 98444064 or www.herbiguide.com.au for more information.