Almond

Prunus dulcis

Synonyms - Prunus amygdalus, Prunus communis

Family: Drupoideae

Names:

Other Names:

Summary:

A nut tree.

Description:

Cotyledons:

Two.

First leaves:

Leaves:

Alternate. Simple.
Stipules - Yes
Petiole - Yes.
Blade - Oval. Pointed tip, rounded edges, tapering base

Stems:

To several metres high. Acutely branched.

Flower head:

Flowers:

Regular bisexual.
Ovary - Superior, 1 celled. 1 style.
Sepals - 4-5. Attached at the top of the receptacle.
Petals - 4-5 that fall off soon after opening. Attached at the top of the receptacle.
Stamens -
Anthers -

Fruit:

A firm nut that is free but enclosed in a hard oval case.

Seeds:

Roots:

Taproot.

Key Characters:

A small tree.
Alternate simple leaves.
Flowers with 4-5 petals.
A firm nut that is free but enclosed in a hard oval case.

Biology:

Life cycle:

Perennial, deciduous.

Physiology:

Reproduction:

Flowering times:

Seed Biology and Germination:

Vegetative Propagules:

Hybrids:

Allelopathy:

Population Dynamics and Dispersal:

Origin and History:

Southern Asia.

Distribution:

ACT, NSW, NT, QLD, SA, TAS, VIC, WA in gardens and orchards but rarely naturalised.

Courtesy Australia's Virtual Herbarium.

Habitats:

Climate:

Cool temperate

Soil:

Free draining.

Plant Associations:

Significance:

Beneficial:

Important commercial nut crop.
Rarely naturalises.

Detrimental:

May be toxic.

Toxicity:

Bitter Almond seeds are toxic.
Leaves seeds and bark contain one or more glycosides which may release cyanide.

Symptoms:

Treatment:

Legislation:

Management and Control:

Manual removal or cutting off close to the base is usually successful.
Herbicides provide good control.

Thresholds:

Eradication strategies:

Manually remove, fell or apply herbicides such as triclopyr, triclopyr plus picloram or glyphosate.

Herbicide resistance:

None reported.

Biological Control:

Related plants:

Almond (Prunus amygdalus, Prunus dulcis or Prunus communis)
American Red Plum (Prunus americana)
Apricot (Prunus armeniaca)
Bird Cherry (Prunus padus)
Bullace (Prunus insititia)
Catalina Cherry (Prunus lyonii)
Cherry (Prunus avium)
Cherry Laurel (Prunus laurocerasus)
Cherry Plum (Prunus cerasifera)
Chinese Cherry (Prunus japonica)
Chinese Flowering Almond (Prunus glandulosa)
Chokecherry or Virginian Bird Cherry (Prunus virginiana)
Flowering Almond (Prunus triloba)
Fuji Cherry (Prunus incisa)
Goose Plum (Prunus hortulana)
Holy-leaved Cherry (Prunus ilicifolia)
Japanese Apricot (Prunus mume)
Japanese Cherry (Prunus sargentii)
Japanese Flowering Cherry (Prunus serrulata)
Japanese Plum (Prunus salicina)
Manchurian Cherry (Prunus maakii)
Nectarine (Prunus persica var. nectarina)
Peach (Prunus persica var. persica)
Perfumed Cherry or St Lucia Cherry (Prunus mahaleb)
Pin Cherry or Wild Cherry (Prunus pennsylvanica)
Plum (Prunus X domestica or Prunus spinosa)
Portugal Laurel (Prunus lusitanica)
Rosebud Cherry (Prunus subhirtella)
Sour Cherry (Prunus cerasus)
Sweet Cherry (Prunus avium)
Taiwan Cherry (Prunus campanulata)
Wild Cherry (Prunus serotina)
Yoshino Cherry (Prunus yedoensis)

Plants of similar appearance:

References:

Bodkin, F. (1986). Encyclopaedia Botanica. (Angus and Robertson, Australia).

Everist, S.L. (1974). Poisonous Plants of Australia. (Angus and Robertson, Sydney).

Lamp, C. and Collet, F. (1990). A Field Guide to Weeds in Australia. (Inkata Press, Melbourne).

Randall, J.M. and Marinelli, J. (1996) Invasive Plants. (Brooklyn Botanic Gardens Inc. Brooklyn). P. Photo.

Acknowledgments:

Collated by HerbiGuide. Phone 08 98444064 or www.herbiguide.com.au for more information.