Grapevine

Vitis vinifera L.

Order: Rhamnales

Family: Vitaceae

Names:

Other Names:

Summary:

Description:

Cotyledons:

Two.

Leaves:

Stipules -
Petiole - Yes.
Blade - Large, 3-7 lobed, obvious veins, dark green on top and lighter underneath.

Stems:

Vine with stringy bark

Flower head:

Flowers:

Ovary -
Calyx -
Perianth -
Sepals -
Petals - 5, united at the tip and fall as a cap.
Stamens -
Anthers -

Fruit:

Globular berry.

Seeds:

Roots:

Key Characters:

3-7 lobed large leaves.
Deciduous.
Stem is a vine with stringy bark.
Fruit are berries occurring in bunches.

Biology:

Life cycle:

Perennial vine

Physiology:

Sensitive to late spring frosts.
Low chilling requirement.

Reproduction:

Seeds and cuttings.

Flowering times:

Summer.

Seed Biology and Germination:

Vegetative Propagules:

Stem fragments.

Hybrids:

Allelopathy:

Population Dynamics and Dispersal:

Spread mainly by intentional planting. Seeds will also germinate and establish. Pruning and cuttings will take root where they contact the soil.

Origin and History:

Mediterranean. Turkey.
Introduced for cultivation.
The first vineyard was in Governor Phillips garden in Parramatta in 1789 using cuttings from Rio de Janeiro and Cape Town

Distribution:

ACT, NSW, NT, QLD, SA, TAS, VIC, WA.

Courtesy Australia's Virtual Herbarium.

Habitats:

Climate:

Warm to hot regions with an annual rainfall of more than 500 mm, preferably without summer rains.

Soil:

Grows on a wide range of soils but prefer sandy loams to clay loams.

Plant Associations:

Significance:

Beneficial:

Grapes used for making wine, juice, vinegar, sultanas, currants, raisins or eaten fresh.
Medicinal uses.

Detrimental:

Toxicity:

Symptoms:

Treatment:

Legislation:

Management and Control:

Thresholds:

Eradication strategies:

Herbicide resistance:

Biological Control:

Sensitive to Phylloxera and commercial vineyards often use resistant rootstocks in areas where it is common.
Sensitive to nematodes, Bud Mites, Light Brown Apple Moth, Vine Scale, Black spot, Botrytis (Grey Mould), Downy Mildew, Powdery Mildew, Pythium Crown Rot and Leaf Roll Virus.

Related plants:

None.

Plants of similar appearance:

References:

Lazarides, M. and Hince, B. (1993). CSIRO handbook of economic plants of Australia. (CSIRO, Melbourne). #1273.1.

Reid, R.L. (1990) The Manual of Australian Agriculture. (Butterworths, Sydney). P175-177.

Acknowledgments:

Collated by HerbiGuide. Phone 08 98444064 or www.herbiguide.com.au for more information.