Greater Bindweed

Calystegia sepium (L.) R. Br. & Calystegia silvatica (Kit.) Griseb.

Synonyms - Convolvulus sepium

Family: Convolvulaceae.

Names:

Calystegia is from the Greek kalyx meaning calyx and stege meaning a covering and refers to the 2 bracteoles covering the calyx.
Sepium means 'of the hedges'.
Greater Bindweed

Other Names:

Greater Convolvulus

Summary:

A perennial, hairless, running vine with arrow shaped leaves and pale lilac bell shaped flowers with a white throat.

Description:

Cotyledons:

Two. Tip indented. Sides indented. Base indented. Surface hairless. Petiole about the same length as the blade.

Leaves:

Alternate.
Stipules - None.
Petiole - Slender. Hairless. About the same length as the blade.
Blade - Arrow shaped to egg or lance shaped, 40-100 mm long, pointed tip, basal lobes rounded or angular. Sides indented to constricted. Base indented. Surface hairless.

Stems:

Long, running vines.

Flower head:

Single flowers.

Flowers:

Single, regular, bisexual, on stalks in leaf axils.
Bracts - 2 large bracts enclose the calyx.
Ovary - Superior, incompletely 2 celled, surrounded by a fleshy 5 angled disk at the base. 1-2 basal, erect, ovules in each cell.
Styles - 1, undivided,
Stigma - 2 oblong lobes
Calyx (Sepals) - Persistent, egg to lance shaped, 12-15 mm long.
Corolla (Petals) - Pale lilac lobes with a white tube, bell shaped, 40-50 mm long
Stamens - 5, inserted on the corolla tube, alternate with the lobes.
Anthers - 2 celled.

Fruit:

1 celled, globular or egg shaped capsule.

Seeds:

Usually 1-3, egg shaped, black, 4-5 mm long.

Roots:

Key Characters:

Biology:

Life cycle:

Perennial.
Growth from the roots appears during the late winter and early spring. Flowering occurs during early summer and may continue through into autumn.

Physiology:

Reproduction:

By seed and running vines.

Flowering times:

Summer.

Seed Biology and Germination:

Vegetative Propagules:

Hybrids:

Allelopathy:

Population Dynamics and Dispersal:

Origin and History:

C. sepium is cosmopolitan and is probably the 'woodbine' referred to by Shakespeare.
C. silvatica is native to South Eastern Europe.

Distribution:

Calystegia sepium - ACT, NSW, SA, TAS, VIC, WA.
Calystegia silvatica - NSW, TAS, VIC.
Widely distributed through Tasmania.

Distribution of Calystegia sepium.
Courtesy Australia's Virtual Herbarium.

Distribution of Calystegia silvatica
Courtesy Australia's Virtual Herbarium.

Habitats:

Climate:

Temperate.

Soil:

Plant Associations:

Significance:

Beneficial:

Detrimental:

Weed of roadsides and in urban areas where it is commonly found over-growing fences.

Toxicity:

Not recorded as toxic.

Legislation:

None.

Management and Control:

Thresholds:

Eradication strategies:

Herbicide resistance:

Biological Control:

Related plants:

Plants of similar appearance:

Generally similar in appearance to Bindweed (C. arvensis). The leaves are larger and relatively broader. The flower is larger than that of Bindweed, a purer white and less inclined to be pinkish.

References:

Black, J.M. (1965). Flora of South Australia. (Government Printer, Adelaide, South Australia). P700. Diagram.

Hyde-Wyatt, B.H. and Morris, D.I. (1980) The Noxious and Secondary Weeds of Tasmania. (Tasmanian Department of Agriculture, Hobart, Tasmania). P63. Diagram.

Lamp, C. and Collet, F. (1990). A Field Guide to Weeds in Australia. (Inkata Press, Melbourne).

Lazarides, M. and Hince, B. (1993). CSIRO handbook of economic plants of Australia. (CSIRO, Melbourne). #234.1, 234.2.

Acknowledgments:

Collated by HerbiGuide. Phone 08 98444064 or www.herbiguide.com.au for more information for more information.