Sage

Salvia officinalis L.

Order: Lamiales

Family: Lamiaceae

Names:

Salvia
Officinalis is medieval Latin meaning belonging to an officina or monastery store room where medicines were kept and is now applied to plants (or other organisms) that had an established herbal, medical, culinary or other use.
Sage

Other Names:

Summary:

An aromatic perennial herb.

Description:

Cotyledons:

Two.

Leaves:

Aromatic.
Stipules -
Petiole -
Blade -

Stems:

Slender, aromatic.

Flower head:

Flowers:

Ovary -
Calyx -
Perianth -
Sepals -
Petals -
Stamens -
Anthers -

Fruit:

Seeds:

Roots:

Key Characters:

Biology:

Life cycle:

Perennial small shrub.

Physiology:

Reproduction:

By seed.

Flowering times:

Seed Biology and Germination:

Vegetative Propagules:

Hybrids:

Allelopathy:

Population Dynamics and Dispersal:

Spread mainly by intentional planting.

Origin and History:

Mediterranean.
Introduced as a cultivated herb.

Distribution:

ACT, NSW, NT, QLD, SA, TAS, VIC, WA.
Not naturalised.

Habitats:

Climate:

Temperate.

Soil:

Plant Associations:

Significance:

Beneficial:

Used as a herb and garnish for human consumption.
Oils.
Medicine.
Ornamental.

Detrimental:

Toxicity:

Not recorded as toxic.

Legislation:

None.

Management and Control:

Sage often suffers from mildew.

Thresholds:

Eradication strategies:

Herbicide resistance:

Biological Control:

Related plants:

Red Salvia (Salvia coccinea)
Mintweed (Salvia reflexa)
Wild Sage (Salvia verbenaca)

Plants of similar appearance:

References:

Lazarides, M. and Hince, B. (1993). CSIRO handbook of economic plants of Australia. (CSIRO, Melbourne).1083.2.

Acknowledgments:

Collated by HerbiGuide. Phone 08 98444064 or www.herbiguide.com.au for more information.