Silver Podalyria

Podalyria sericea (Andrews) R.Br.

Synonyms -

Family: Fabaceae

Names:

Other Names:

Summary:

An erect, silver leaved shrub to 2.5 m high with mauve pea type flowers and fat pods

Description:

Cotyledons:

Two.

First leaves:

Leaves:

Alternate. Simple
Stipules - 3-5 mm long.
Petiole - very short.
Blade - Elliptical to egg shaped, 15-30 mm long x 9-18 mm wide. Covered in dense adpressed white hairs giving it a silvery appearance. Tip pointed with a recurved tip. Sides curved. Base tapered.

Stems:

Erect, 0.5-2.5 m tall.

Flower head:

Single axillary flowers on stalks 5 mm long. Bracts are shed early,

Flowers:

Purple-blue to mauve, pink or white, sweetly fragrant, pea type. Bisexual.
Ovary -
Calyx - Bell shaped, 7-10 mm long, silky. 5 lobed and slightly 2 lipped with 2 lobes joined slightly higher than the other three.
Petals - 5. Standard 5 mm long and notched. Keel 7 mm long and rounded
Stamens - 10, distinct and free.
Anthers -

Fruit:

Inflated brown pod with dense silvery, silky hairs. Stalkless, oblong to ellipsoid with a pointed tip, 25-30 mm long and 10-14 mm wide

Seeds:

Roots:

Taproot.

Key Characters:

Silvery shrub.
Simple, alternate, silky-hairy leaves.
Single, pink, purple or white pea type flowers.
Ten distinct and free stamens.

Biology:

Life cycle:

Perennial.

Physiology:

Fixes nitrogen.

Reproduction:

By seed.

Flowering times:

Probably winter in WA.

Seed Biology and Germination:

Vegetative Propagules:

Hybrids:

Allelopathy:

Population Dynamics and Dispersal:

Long distance spread by intentional planting. Medium distance spread usually by road works. Local spread by seed.

Origin and History:

Native to South Africa.

Distribution:

WA.
Jarrah Forest and Warren regions of WA.

Habitats:

Gardens, wastelands and road verges.

Climate:

Cool temperate. Mediterranean.

Soil:

Sands and gravels.

Plant Associations:

Significance:

Beneficial:

Ornamental.

Detrimental:

Environmental weed of roadsides and disturbed areas.
Garden escape

Toxicity:

Not recorded as toxic.

Symptoms:

Treatment:

Legislation:

None.

Management and Control:

Manual removal is effective. Seedlings may need to be removed for the next few years.
Lontrel and metsulfuron are expected to give good control.

Thresholds:

Eradication strategies:

Manually remove large plants or spray until just wet with 1 g metsulfuron600 plus 25 mL Pulse® penetrant per 10 litres of water. In bushland areas try 10 mL clopyralid300 plus 25 mL Pulse® penetrant per 10 L water as a more selective spray. Picloram containing products may provide season-long control of seedlings.
Burn the area to encourage seed germination.
Spray seedlings with half rates of the herbicides above or manually remove them.
It is expected that seed will remain viable in the soil for a few years at least.

Herbicide resistance:

None reported.

Biological Control:

Related plants:

In the Pea or Fabaceae family.

Plants of similar appearance:

Queensland Silver Wattle (Acacia podalyriifolia) has yellow, ball-like flowers.
Cudweeds have no pods.

References:

Bodkin, F. (1986). Encyclopaedia Botanica. (Angus and Robertson, Australia).

Everist, S.L. (1974). Poisonous Plants of Australia. (Angus and Robertson, Sydney).

Hussey, B.M.J., Keighery, G.J., Cousens, R.D., Dodd, J. and Lloyd, S.G. (1997). Western Weeds. A guide to the weeds of Western Australia. (Plant Protection Society of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia). P162.

Lazarides, M. and Cowley, K. and Hohnen, P. (1997). CSIRO handbook of Australian Weeds. (CSIRO, Melbourne). 801.1.

Paczkowska, G. and Chapman, A. (2000). The Western Australia flora: a descriptive catalogue. (Wildflower Society of Western Australia (Inc), the Western Australian Herbarium, CALM and the Botanic Gardens & Parks Authority). P444.

Wheeler, Judy, Marchant, Neville and Lewington, Margaret. (2002). Flora of the South West: Bunbury - Augusta - Denmark. (Western Australian Herbarium, Bentley, Western Australia). 772. Diagram.

Acknowledgments:

Collated by HerbiGuide. Phone 08 98444064 for more information.