Simazine Flowable 500

1 Trade nameManufacturerForm
ACCENSI SIMAZINE 500 FLOWABLE HERBICIDEACCENSI PTY LTDSUSPENSION CONCENTRATE
AGROREG SIMAZINE 500 SC HERBICIDEOZCROP PTY. LTD.SUSPENSION CONCENTRATE
CHEMAG SIMAZINE 500 FLOWABLE HERBICIDEIMTRADE AUSTRALIA PTY LTDSUSPENSION CONCENTRATE
FARMOZ SIMAZINE 500 FLOWABLE HERBICIDEADAMA AUSTRALIA PTY LIMITEDSUSPENSION CONCENTRATE
FLOWABLE GESATOP 600 SC LIQUID HERBICIDESYNGENTA AUSTRALIA PTY LTDSUSPENSION CONCENTRATE
SIMANEX 600 SC HERBICIDEADAMA AUSTRALIA PTY LIMITEDSUSPENSION CONCENTRATE
SIMPLEX 500 SC HERBICIDEAMGROW PTY LTDSUSPENSION CONCENTRATE
SIPCAM SIMAZINE 500 FLOWABLE HERBICIDESIPCAM PACIFIC AUSTRALIA PTY LTDSUSPENSION CONCENTRATE
SIPCAM SIMAZINE 600 FLOWABLE HERBICIDESIPCAM PACIFIC AUSTRALIA PTY LTDSUSPENSION CONCENTRATE

3 ACTIVE INGREDIENTS: Simazine 500 g/L as a liquid suspension.

4 CHEMICAL GROUP: C.

6 GENERAL DESCRIPTION:

A pre-emergence, translocated, root absorbed soil-residual herbicide. It is selective at low rates providing control of a range of annual grasses and annual broad-leaved weeds in annual Fabaceae crops. At higher rates it is less selective controlling a range of annual weeds in established perennial crops, orchards, vineyards, plantations, bulb crops and triazine tolerant crops.

It is of low toxicity to mammals, birds, fish, crustacea and bees but toxic to algae.

Simazine has been used for many years over large areas with few problems. It has been detected in ground water and contamination is an issue oversees but is of little environmental or health significance. It is rarely detected in ground water in Australia and buffer zones are required in some situations.

7 APPLICATION METHODS AND TIPS:

Best results when applied to moist, trash free soil with a fine tilth before weeds emerge and rain follows a day or two later.

Use lower rates on light soils, low in organic matter. Use higher rates on heavier soils and/or high free organic matter or where crop residues are present.

Where there is complete cover of stubble on the ground, 30-40% of the applied simazine may be lost (absorbed).

8 WEATHER:

Rainfast immediately.

Frost effects: Stress resulting in reduction in root activity of weeds will result in poorer uptake of herbicide and potentially poorer weed control.

Wind: Little effect.

Inversions: Avoid application during low level inversions as excessive drift may occur. This rarely causes problems with simazine.

Temperature: Little effect.

Delta T and relative humidity: Little effect.

9 ADJUVANTS:

Wetting agents: compatible but not required.

Spray oils: compatible but usually not required. Control of cotyledonary seedlings may be slightly improved by adding a spray oil.

10 WATER QUALITY:

Hard water: Usually OK, but simazine is susceptible to slow alkaline hydrolysis.

Salty water: Usually OK. If using saline water add LI 700 at 100 mL/100 L of spray mix.

Colloids: Usually OK.

pH: Generally little effect.

Tank life: >1-2 weeks. Maybe less in acid water.

11 COMPATIBILITY:

Trace elements.

See HerbiGuide Compatibilities button.

12 EQUIPMENT:

Boom sprays:

Carrier volume: 20-500 L/ha. Use higher speeds rather than smaller nozzles to achieve low water rates.

Nozzles: Flat fan. Small nozzles may lead to a large number of blockages.

Pressure: 150-400 kPa.

Droplet size: Not critical.

Filter Sizes : 50 or 80 are preferred. 100 mesh are acceptable. 120 mesh tend to block too often.

Hand sprays:

Carrier volume: 500-3000 L/ha

Nozzles: Flat fan, cone, disk or reflex flood jet.

Pressure: 150-400 kPa.

Droplet size: Not critical.

Aerial application:

Carrier volume: 30 L/ha - tends to strip.

13 SPRAYER DECONTAMINATION:

Clean Up:

Clean soon after spraying to reduce the risk of forming dried deposits that may be difficult to remove. Mechanically removed any caked deposits.

Remove filters and clean separately. Rinse with soapy water (eg 500 mL or g of Drive, Dynamo, Omo or Surf per 100 L water) or water plus 0.25% wetting agent and run through boom. Rinse with water.

Decontamination:

Remove filters and clean then soak in 500 mL household ammonia in 10 L water for 30 minutes.

Rinse sprayer with soapy water (eg 500 mL or g of Drive, Dynamo, Omo or Surf per 100 L water) or water plus 0.25% wetting agent and run through boom. Add 1 L of household ammonia (3% active ingredient) per 100 L water while filling the tank. Circulate through the system and spray a small quantity through the boom then allow to stand for several hours. Rinse with soapy water or water plus 0.25% wetting agent. Rinse with water. Or use a commercial spray tank and equipment cleaner.

Rinse nozzles and filters in water and replace then rinse the whole system with water again.

14 HERBICIDE RESISTANCE:

Tolerant plants are expected to occur and may dominate the weed population after repeated applications.

15 REPLANTING INTERVALS:

CropTime
Labelled crops0 days.
All other crops9 months for rates up 4.5 L/ha.
All other crops18 months for rates > 4.5 L/ha.

If in doubt delay planting sensitive plants until the appearance of susceptible weeds as this indicates that the residue has probably dissipated.

16 WITHHOLDING PERIODS:

CropTypeTime
AllHarvestNot required
Beans; FabaGrazing8 weeks
CanolaGrazing15 weeks
ChickpeaGrazing9 weeks
CloverGrazing14 days
CloverCutting for stock food21 days

17 RE-ENTRY PERIOD:

Wear protective clothing if in contact with the crop before the spray has dried.

18 PROTECTIVE CLOTHING:

Overalls, boots and washable hat. Use gloves and face shield when handling the concentrate.

19 SOIL:

Soil texture: Heavier soil types require higher rates.

Soil pH: Increasing soil pH decreases the rate of breakdown.

Soil organic matter: Increasing levels of organic matter requires higher rates.

Soil moisture at application: On dry soils weed control may be reduced if irrigation or rain is not received within 7-10 days of application. Shallow mechanical incorporation under dry conditions often improves weed control.

On moist soils the herbicide is bonded to soil particles and good weed control should ensue.

IN waterlogged conditions simazine may be hydrolysed resulting in loss of active constituent and penetration into the root zone is reduced which may result in poor weed control.

Where there is complete cover of stubble on the ground, 30-40% of the applied simazine may be lost (absorbed).

20 MODE OF ACTION:

Group C. Triazine group. Inhibits photosynthesis at photosystem II.

Uptake and translocation:

Absorbed by roots and transported within the plant to leaves where it interferes with photosynthesis.

Physiological effects:

Absorbed by plants where it is concentrated and remains relatively intact in susceptible species or is metabolised in tolerant species.

Susceptible plants accumulate simazine in the growing points, causing chlorosis and death.

C4 plants are usually tolerant and C3 plants usually susceptible.

Triazine tolerant plants have an alternative photosynthetic mechanism.

Residual Life and Breakdown:

The half life is typically 40-60 days with a range of 27 -149 days. It is more residual in high pH (alkaline) soils. It is broken down mainly by microbial action but hydrolysis is significant in acid soils.

21 SELECTIVITY:

Crop tolerance:

Application of simazine after seeding in reduced tillage systems may damage the crop (especially cereals and canola).

Intense heavy rainfall after application can cause crop damage. This is more pronounced if furrow planted crops where the simazine may wash into the furrows.

Varietal sensitivities:

Effect on Clover Species:

Generally little effect. Early sprays may reduce establishment.

Sub Clover - tolerant after 3 leaf stage to 1.5 L g/ha. Damage more severe when growing in light textured soils. Limited trial information indicates varieties differ in their tolerance with Karridale being less tolerant then Dalkeith.

White Clover - Tolerant. Limited trial information indicates plants beyond the 5 leaf stage are capable of tolerating 1.25 L/ha of simazine900.

Effect on Medic Species:

Tends to reduce medics. Early sprays may reduce establishment.

Effect on Lucerne:

Established lucerne is tolerant. It may reduce the density of young lucerne stands.

Effect on Native Plants:

Most established native plants are tolerant. Many native species germinating from seed are sensitive.

22 DISEASE AND INSECT EFFECTS:

Crop damage may be more greater where root systems have been affected by insects or diseases.

23 PLANT SYMPTOMS:

Susceptible plants normally emerge the turn yellow or form burnt edges then die in 1-4 weeks.

SECONDARY EFFECTS:

24 TOXICITY:

Summary:

Low toxicity to mammals, birds, fish, crustacea and bees but toxic to algae.

Details:

Poison schedule: Exempt from scheduling.

Mammalian toxicity: Low.

Acute oral LD50: >5000 mg/kg (rat), [For comparison table salt is 3000 mg/kg]

Acute dermal LD50: > mg/kg (rabbit).

Skin: Not a skin irritant. Not a likely route of exposure due to physical properties of the product.

Eye: Not an irritant.

Vapour inhalation: LC50 >5.5 mg/L air (rat).

Chronic oral toxicity: NOEL mg/kg for two years.

Carcinogenicity: Classed as a category 3 carcinogen. This means that it is not

classifiable as to carcinogenicity to humans. Simazine has been assessed in animals and some data exists that simazine is a substance which causes some concern for humans owing to possible carcinogenic effects from long term exposure, but the available information is not adequate for making a satisfactory assessment.

Not mutagenic or teratogenic in animal studies (i.e. does not cause cancer or reproductive problems in animal tests).

Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI): 0.005 mg/kg/day.

No observable effect level (NOEL): 0.5 mg/kg/day.

Other Species:

Birds: Not toxic. LD50 >2000 mg/kg for mallard duck.

Fish: Not toxic LC50(96 hour) >100 mg/L for Rainbow trout.

Invertebrates: Not toxic. LC50(48 hour) >100 mg/L for Daphnia spp.

Bees: Not toxic. LD50 >99 µg/bee.

Arthropods: toxicity.

Earthworms:

Algae: High toxicity. EC50(72hr) = 0.04 mg/L for Scenedesmus subspicatus.

Accumulation: Doesn't accumulate.

25 TOXICITY SYMPTOMS:

26 FIRST AID:

If SWALLOWED: Wash out mouth with water. Do NOT induce vomiting. Do NOT give anything by mouth to a semiconscious or unconscious patient. Seek medical advice immediately. If vomiting occurs then place patient to prevent vomit from entering the lungs.

If in EYES: Hold eyelids open and wash eyes with plenty of water for 5 minutes, remove contact lenses if present and wash for a further 10 minutes. See a doctor if symptoms persist.

If on SKIN: Remove contaminated clothing. Wash skin thoroughly with soap and water.

If INHALED: Remove patient to fresh air.

Advice to doctor: Treat symptomatically.

Contact the Poisons Information Centre on 131126.

27 ENVIRONMENTAL FATE:

Half life in soil: 40 days at 20 degrees and 50% WHC in Mohlin soil. Typically 60 days with a range of 27 -149 days. It is more residual in high pH (alkaline) soils.

Half life in water: Average of 30 days in ponds. Somewhat shorter if large amounts of algae are present.

It has an EPA classification for soil mobility that ranges from

It has a leaching index of 5. (for comparison, trifluralin is 0-1 and chlorsulfuron is 25-30). Leaching is limited by its low water solubility.

Ground water contamination: Possible.

Accumulation in milk and tissues:

pH stability:

Photolysis rate: Low under field conditions.

Hydrolysis half life: Hydrolyses at low pH. Little hydrolysis at pH 7.

Biodegradation rate:

Bioconcentration factor (BCF):

Breakdown equation R=1.021*10^0.015 in WA.

Where there is complete cover of stubble on the ground, 30-40% of the applied simazine may be lost (absorbed).

28 REGISTERED CROPS:

See HerbiGuide Species Solution tab.

29 REGISTERED WEEDS:

See HerbiGuide Species Solution tab.

30 REGULATION AND LEGAL:

UN number: 3077.

CAS numbers: Simazine 122-34-9. Talc 14807-96-6.

OPP Chemical Code:

Hazchem code: None allocated.

NOHSC classification: Hazardous. Harmful.

Land transport:

Dangerous goods class (ADG): Not classified as a dangerous good for transport.

Sea transport:

Proper shipping name: ENVIRONMENTALLY HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCE, SOLID, N.O.S. (contains Simazine)

International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code (IMDG):

Class: 9.

Packaging group:

EPG:

Marine pollutant

Risk phrases:

R40(3) Possible risk of irreversible effects.

Safety phrases:

S36/37 Wear suitable protective clothing and gloves.

Buffer zones:

60 m downwind buffer zone to lakes and dams. 20 m buffer zone on waterways and wells. Don't apply to areas where runoff to natural waterways is likely to occur.

31 PROPERTIES:

Colour: Cream.

Odour:

Form: Liquid and somewhat viscous.

Chemical name:

Empirical formula:

IUPAC:

CAS: Simazine 122-34-9.

Water solubility: 5-6.2 mg/L at 25 C at pH.

Oil solubility:

Octanol:Water ratio: LogPow = 2.1 at 25 C at pH for simazine technical grade.

Soil organic carbon absorption coefficient (Koc): 130 mL/g.

Vapour Pressure: 0.013 mPa (Piper 87 quotes 8.3 x 10-7 Pa = 6.23 x 10-9 mm Hg). <0.001 kPa for simazine technical grade.

Vapour density:

Dissociation constant: pKa

Melting point: 225-2270C for simazine technical grade.

Boiling point: C.

Molecular weight:

Bulk density:

Specific gravity:

Viscosity: CPS.

pH:

Flammability: Non flammable. Dried residue is probably combustible.

Flashpoint: C.

Autoignition: C.

Corrosivity:

Shelf Life: >2 years.

(When Stored under Ideal Conditions)

Stability: Subject to hydrolysis and sublimation at high temperatures.

Hazardous polymerisation is not possible.

32 SPILLS:

Absorb spill with earth, sand, clay or absorbent material such as vermiculite and dispose in a lime pit.

Contaminated soil may be treated with 10 kg lime per square metre and kept moist to assist with breakdown.

33 FIRE:

Extinguish with water spray, foam, carbon dioxide or dry agent.

Toxic fumes may be released in fire. Wear breathing apparatus or avoid smoke.

Prevent excessive amounts of fire water from entering drains or water bodies.

34 COMMENTS:

No rainfall and dry soil are likely to cause problems in the performance of this herbicide under field conditions.

Leaching is limited by its low water solubility.

35 REFERENCES:

Ashton, F.M. and Crafts, A.S. (1981) Mode of Action of Herbicides. (Wiley-Interscience publication).

Kearney, P.C. and Kaufman, D.D. (1976). Herbicides. Chemistry, degradation and mode of action. Vol 1 & 2.

Piper (1987)

Acknowledgments:

Collated by HerbiGuide. For more information see www.herbiguide.com.au or phone 08 98444064.