Tasmanian Blue Gum

Eucalyptus globulus Labill. ssp. globulus

Synonyms -

Family: Myrtaceae

Names:

Other Names:

Bluegum Eucalyptus - USA.

Summary:

A straight trunk tree up to 40 m tall with shedding bark and leaves that smell of eucalyptus oil when crushed. Young trees have square stems and soft, whitish blue oval leaves. Older trees have waxy, shiny sickle shaped leaves that hang vertically. It has creamy white to yellow flowers with 2.5 cm diameter, woody, ribbed, blue grey fruits

Description:

Cotyledons:

Two.

First leaves:

Opposite. Bluish.

Leaves:

Stipules -
Petiole -
Blade -

Stems:

Coppice when cut.
Sapwood is diffuse porous.

Flower head:

Flowers:

Ovary -
Calyx -
Perianth -
Sepals -
Petals -
Stamens -
Anthers -

Fruit:

Seeds:

Roots:

Key Characters:

Biology:

Life cycle:

Physiology:

Reproduction:

Flowering times:

Seed Biology and Germination:

Vegetative Propagules:

Hybrids:

Four sub species are recognised.

Allelopathy:

Population Dynamics and Dispersal:

Seed is dispersed by wind. Most infestation result from intentional plantings for windbreaks or pulp wood plantations.

Origin and History:

Native of Tasmania.
Floral emblem of Tasmania.

Distribution:

ACT, NSW, SA, TAS, VIC, WA.

Courtesy Australia's Virtual Herbarium.

Habitats:

Climate:

Tends to be weedy in temperate and Mediterranean climates.

Soil:

Prefers deep well drained soils.

Plant Associations:

Significance:

Beneficial:

Pulp, timber, oil, honey, gums, windbreaks.
Used in herbal medicine.
Ornamental.

Detrimental:

Produces quantities of fire prone litter composed of bark, leaves, twigs and small limbs.
Limbs often fall in both calm and windy conditions causing a safety hazard.
Invasive weed of grassland and shrub land areas.
Invasive weed of the USA.

Toxicity:

None reported.

Symptoms:

Treatment:

Legislation:

None.

Management and Control:

Control seedlings and saplings around plantation areas.

Thresholds:

Eradication strategies:

Small trees and seedlings may be sprayed with metsulfuron, triclopyr or high rates of glyphosate.
Cut down the tree then paint the outer circumference of the cut stump immediately with glyphosate or wait until the sprouts grow to 1 m tall the spray with metsulfuron, triclopyr or glyphosate. Cut stump treatment with glyphosate appears to work better in autumn.
Or
Cut down the tree then the stumps must be removed to a depth of 200-300 mm below ground level to prevent re sprouting.
Or
Cut down the tree may then knock off the sprouts each time they reach 1-2 m tall over a three year period.

Herbicide resistance:

None reported.

Biological Control:

Related plants:

Eucalyptus species

Plants of similar appearance:

Trees.

References:

Bodkin, F. (1986). Encyclopaedia Botanica. (Angus and Robertson, Australia).

Everist, S.L. (1974). Poisonous Plants of Australia. (Angus and Robertson, Sydney).

Lamp, C. and Collet, F. (1990). A Field Guide to Weeds in Australia. (Inkata Press, Melbourne).

Lazarides, M. and Cowley, K. and Hohnen, P. (1997). CSIRO handbook of Australian Weeds. (CSIRO, Melbourne). #408.6.

Randall, J.M. and Marinelli, J. (1996) Invasive Plants. (Brooklyn Botanic Gardens Inc. Brooklyn). P32. Photo.

Acknowledgments:

Collated by HerbiGuide. Phone 08 98444064 or www.herbiguide.com.au for more information.