Tulip

Tulipa species

Synonyms - Most commercial species are various crosses between Tulipa fosteriana, Tulipa gesneriana, Tulipa greigi, Tulipa kaufmanniana or Tulipa suaveolens

Order: Liliales

Family: Liliaceae

Names:

Tulipa is from the Persian word for turban and either refers to the shape of the flower being like a turban or due to the practice of wearing tulips on turbans.
Tulip is from the genus name.

Other Names:

Summary:

Description:

Cotyledons:

One.

Leaves:

Clustered at the base of the plant.
Stipules -
Petiole -
Blade - Thick, blue green

Stems:

Thick, fleshy.

Flower head:

Single flowers at the ends of the stem.

Flowers:

Bell shaped of various colours.
Ovary -
Calyx -
Perianth -
Sepals -
Petals - 6
Stamens - 6
Anthers - 6

Fruit:

Many seeded capsule.

Seeds:

Many, small.

Roots:

Scaly bulb.

Key Characters:

Thick blue green leaves arising from the base.
Single bell shaped of various colours at the ends of stems.
Large bulb.

Biology:

Life cycle:

Annual tops and flowers with perennial bulb.

Physiology:

Reproduction:

Mainly by bulb.

Flowering times:

Seed Biology and Germination:

Vegetative Propagules:

Bulbs.

Hybrids:

Older varieties often derived from a cross between Tulipa gesneriana and Tulipa suaveolens. Newer varieties often have Tulipa fosteriana, Tulipa greigi or Tulipa kaufmanniana in their parentage.

Allelopathy:

Population Dynamics and Dispersal:

Spread mainly by intentional planting of bulbs.

Origin and History:

Europe.
Introduced as a cut flower crop.

Distribution:

ACT, NSW, SA, TAS, VIC, WA.
No herbarium records.

Habitats:

Climate:

Temperate.

Soil:

Plant Associations:

Significance:

Beneficial:

Ornamental.

Detrimental:

Toxicity:

Not recorded as toxic.

Legislation:

None.

Management and Control:

Thresholds:

Eradication strategies:

Herbicide resistance:

Biological Control:

Related plants:

Plants of similar appearance:

References:

Anon. (1973). Encyclopaedia Britannica 10:174.

Acknowledgments:

Collated by HerbiGuide. Phone 08 98444064 or www.herbiguide.com.au for more information.